Beginner’s guide to baking: How to make the perfect pavlova

how to make the perfect pavlova

This post is part of our beginner’s guide to baking series – catch up on the other post here and here.

Ever wondered what the trick is to making the perfect pav? Just like everything in baking, it all comes back to a bit of basic science! Here’s everything you need to know to help you make the perfect pavlova every single time.

Do I really need to use old eggs?
If you’re after the best results, the answer is definitely yes! When it comes down to it, pavs are really just made from two key ingredients – eggs and sugar – so it’s important that you make sure these are spot on.

Fresh eggs have thick egg whites which, while great for some things, isn’t ideal when you’re whipping up a pav as it’s harder to get the right amount of volume. Luckily, as eggs age the egg whites thin and create more volume when beaten. Basically, with older eggs you can whip more air into the mixture, giving you a beautifully light and airy pav!

What type of sugar should I use?
While some recipes use standard white sugar, I always use caster sugar when making a pavlova – just like eggs, it all comes back to getting the maximum amount of volume into your mixture.

Remember what I mentioned last time about how sugar digs away at butter to aerate it when you cream them together? Well, this is pretty much the same principle.

Caster sugar is super-fine white sugar, so every spoonful of caster sugar has a greater number of sugar crystals than standard white sugar. When you whip them into your egg white, the jagged edges of the caster sugar help aerate the eggs so your finished meringue mixture is light and airy, just how it should be.

Plus, because the crystals are smaller in caster sugar, it’s easier to dissolve – saving both you time and the pav from being over-beaten.

Can I overbeat the mixture?
Absolutely! Overbeating your meringue mixture causes too many bonds to form between the egg proteins, which basically makes the mixture too tight. This can cause a range of problems like cracking, oozing and collapsing. Not ideal, right?

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Why do pavlovas have vinegar in them?
Adding vinegar to your pavlova mixture helps prevent those nasty side-effects of accidental overbeating by neutralising some of those tight egg proteins.

Vinegar is an acid which means it’s packed with positively charged particles. When added to your mixture, these seek out any charged proteins and neutralise them – helping prevent pavlova disaster!

How about cornflour – what does that do?
Just like vinegar, cornflour also helps keep your egg proteins in line by creating a buffer to help prevent them from overcooking during all that time in the oven. After all, a pav wouldn’t be a pav without being gorgeously marshmallowy inside!

Adding a little cornflour (or arrowroot) to your mixture also helps prevent the egg whites from weeping in the oven – that means no any sticky clear liquid hanging around the base of your pav.

So even though there are only a handful of ingredients in pavlova, there’s actually a lot going on, right? And with so much to keep in mind while you’re baking, it’s totally natural to feel a bit exhausted afterwards.

Fisher & Paykel totally get it, so have created a clever feature on some of their ovens that takes some of the pressure off busy bakers – the cleaning! A range of Fisher & Paykel ovens have a clever Pyrolitic self-cleaning function that takes the chore out of cleaning by naturally breaking down food residue inside the oven at a very high temperature. That means you can throw out those awful oven cleaning sprays and simply wipe out the light ash that remains with a damp cloth. Pretty impressive, huh?

To help Kiwi bakers and cooks get the most out of their time in the kitchen, Fisher & Paykel have created eight different cooking styles – if you know why you cook the way you do, you’re more likely to get the best results. Pop over to the Fisher & Paykel website and do their ‘What’s Your Cooking Style’ quiz – you might be surprised!

Now that you’re a bit of a pavlova expert it’s time to give it a go yourself. Here’s one of my favourite recipes for an awesome pav to help get you started – happy baking!

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Simple pavlova

Ingredients

  • 4 egg whites, room temperature
  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 2 tsp vinegar
  • 6 Tbsp boiling water
  • 1 Tbsp cornflour
  • 1 ½ cups caster sugar

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees Celsius and line a baking tray with baking paper. Draw a circle around a side-plate or small cake tin to use as a guide.
  2. Place egg whites in a large bowl and beat on high until soft peaks form. Gradually add caster sugar, 1 Tbsp at a time, until mixture is thick and glossy (approx. 10 minutes).
  3. Add vanilla, vinegar, boiling water and cornflour and mix for a further 20-30 seconds, until combined. Mixture should be stiff and bowl able to be tipped upside down without anything moving.
  4. Spoon mixture onto prepared baking tray, using traced circle as a guide.
  5. Place in oven and cook for 10 minutes before turning the oven off. Leave pavlova in the oven without opening the door for at least one hour – longer if you have time.
  6. Top with whipped cream and your favourite berries to serve.

This post was made possible thanks to Fisher & Paykel. All words, photos and opinions are, and always will be, my own.



Apple crumble ice cream pie

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Ever find yourself wishing that you could enjoy the beautifully comforting flavours of a good old-fashioned apple crumble without actually having to make one? I totally get it – whether you’re short on time, energy or ingredients, sometimes you just can’t make one.

Luckily Dairyworks gets it too and is celebrating winter with an incredible limited edition Traditional Apple Crumble-flavoured ice cream. Because let’s be honest, it’s never too cold for ice cream!

Packed with all those warm, spicy flavours that you love in a good apple crumble, this new ice cream is so good you’ll want to have a couple of tubs stashed away in the freezer all winter long – especially when you know that you can make this delicious apple crumble ice cream pie with it too!

Imagine a chewy oat and brown sugar biscuit base, filled with flavoursome apple crumble ice cream filling and topped with super-simple brown sugar apple compote for a little extra-something. Sounds good right?

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One of the great things about this dessert (other than how delicious it is!) is that you can get everything ready ahead of time. Why not make life easy for yourself and bake the biscuit base the day before, whip up the apple compote in the morning, then pop everything together just before you want to enjoy it? How you make it is totally up to you.

Like all ice cream desserts, this apple crumble ice cream pie is best served straight from the freezer. Simply cut into slices and pop on a plate with a little extra apple compote and you’re all set. Pop any leftover pie back in the freezer straight away – you won’t want to waste a single slice of this pie!

Dairyworks Traditional Apple Crumble Ice Cream is now in your local supermarket freezer – but get in quick, it’s only around for a limited time.

Dairyworks_Apple-crumble-ice-cream-pie

Apple crumble ice cream pie
Serves approx. eight people

Ingredients

Oat biscuit base
Recipe adapted from Not Quite Nigella

  • 125g butter, softened and divided into 85g and 40g
  • 5 ½ Tbsp brown sugar, packed and divided into 4 Tbsp and 1 ½ Tbsp
  • 2 Tbsp white sugar
  • 1 egg
  • ¾ cup + 2 Tbsp oats
  • ½ cup plain flour
  • 1/8 tsp baking powder
  • 1/8 tsp baking soda

Apple compote

  • ¼ cup brown sugar
  • 30g butter, room temperature
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • ½ tsp mixed spice
  • 2 green apples, cubed

Filling

Method

Base

  1. Preheat oven to 180 degrees Celsius and line a baking tray with baking paper.
  2. In a large bowl, combine 85g of butter, 4 Tbsp brown sugar and the white sugar. Beat until light and fluffy.  Add egg and beat until pale.
  3. Add oats, flour, baking powder and baking soda, and beat until well combined.
  4. Scoop mixture onto prepared baking pan and press out evenly using the back of a wet spoon.
  5. Bake for 16-18 minutes or until lightly golden. Allow to cool.
  6. Once cool, crumble biscuit into a medium bowl. Add 40g butter and 1 ½ Tbsp brown sugar and mix until well combined and mixture sticks together when pressed.
  7. Grease a 25cm loose bottomed flan dish and evenly press oat mixture across the base and sides. Place in oven and bake for 10 minutes, then cool completely.

Apple compote

  1. Place brown sugar and butter in a small pot over medium heat and stir until butter is melted and ingredients are well combined.
  2. Add cinnamon, mixed spice and cubed apple, and stir until all apples are coated. Partially cover pot and allow to simmer for around 10 minutes, stirring occasionally, until apples are tender.
  3. Scoop apple compote into a bowl and refrigerate until completely cool.

Filling

  1. Place ice cream into a large mixing bowl (metal, if possible) and beat on medium until ice cream is just softened. Scoop into prepared base, carefully smoothing with a spatula until base is evenly covered. Return to the freezer for one hour.
  2. When ready to serve, remove from freezer and pop pie out of pan. Top with apple compote and slice. Serve immediately.

This post was made possible thanks to Dairyworks. All words, images and recipes are my own.

Beginner’s guide to baking: Butter – why temperature matters

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This post is part of our beginner’s guide to baking series – catch up on the other post here.

Ever wonder why some recipes call for room temperature butter, while others need cold? Or what to do when a recipe doesn’t specify a temperature at all? I know it’s tempting just to grab a block of butter and start using it, but the temperature of your butter really does matter.  

Why do some recipes ask for room temperature butter?
Most recipes that call for butter to be room temperature have one of two things going on – you’re either going to cream it with sugar, or combine it with something liquid like milk or eggs.

Let’s start with creaming butter and sugar. Just like pretty crystals in a shop, sugar crystals have jagged edges – and that’s actually really important. As you cream room temperature butter and sugar, the sugar is busy digging out little air pockets in the butter. Leave them mixing away for a few minutes in this sweet spot and the mixture becomes smooth, pale and creamy – that’s how you know your creaming is done!

If your butter’s too cold, the sugar isn’t able to dig through the butter the way it should. Too warm? Then the sugar will just scratch around, rather than digging out little airy pockets.

When you’re adding milk or eggs to butter, you want them to combine together beautifully – and to do that, you need room temperature butter (and other ingredients!) If your butter’s cold, it’ll contract together into cold little pieces which stops it from blending together the way you need it to. That’s why you might end up with a curdled or grainy looking batter – not great!

When you bake, the little air pockets you’ve created in the nice room temperature butter give the mixture room to rise – the bubbles from your baking soda and powder fill the space and puff it up.

Psst – find more info about how baking soda and powder work here.

How can I tell if it’s room temperature?
This is easy – you should be able to press your finger into it and easily leave an indent, without your finger sliding around or the whole block caving in.

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I’m in a hurry – how can I warm my butter quickly?
While leaving your butter on the counter for an hour really is the best way to bring it to room temperature, that’s not always practical. Luckily there are a few other things you can try in a pinch:

  • Cube your butter into small pieces and line them up in a sunny spot to warm up. The increased surface area of the butter means it’ll get warmer, faster.
  • Cut the amount of butter you need and pop it on a plate. Fill a glass with hot water and wait until the outside of the glass becomes warm to touch. Pour out the water, quickly dry the glass and invert it over the butter like a dome. The butter will warm up in a couple of minutes – keep an eye on it!
  • You can always use a microwave! Cut the butter you need, place it on a plate and microwave on high for 5 seconds. Open the door, turn the butter and heat for another 5 seconds. Repeat for about 20 seconds until your butter is at room temperature – check by pressing your finger into it gently at each turn.

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Why do some recipes need cold butter?
Many doughs call for cold butter. This is so the butter doesn’t completely blend into the flour when you mix them together. This means that as you roll or press out your dough, the butter gets stretched out and you’re left with long, flat sheets of butter in the dough. Butter contains a lot of water, and this water turns into steam when baked – that helps create layers in your dough. Flaky pastry is the perfect example.

Not all recipes say what temperature it needs to be – what do I do then?
Just have a think about what else is happening in the recipe and go from there. Are you making a dough? Then the butter should almost always be cold. Mixing in liquids, creaming, or trying to make something that needs to rise up nice and fluffy? Then room temperature butter will be the way to go.

The more you learn about the ins and outs of baking the more you realise that it really is a science – every ingredient and instruction is there for a reason. It’s all about striking the perfect balance!

With so much to keep focussed on when you’re baking, it’s really useful to have knowledge and tools on hand to help take the guesswork out of the equation.

That’s why Fisher & Paykel have created a range of intuitive ovens with pre-set functions, which eliminates most of the guesswork when it comes to setting the temperature. This means that the oven sets the most common temperature for whatever you’re cooking –  It’s crazy how clever it is! These ovens come with a recipe menu and digital temperature control so you have exactly what you need to get perfect results every time.

To help Kiwi bakers and cooks get the most out of their time in the kitchen, Fisher & Paykel have created eight different cooking styles – if you know why you cook the way you do, you’re more likely to get the best results. Pop over to the Fisher & Paykel website and do their ‘What’s Your Cooking Style’ quiz – you might be surprised!

Now that you know the science behind baking with butter, it’s time to make the perfect buttercream. Here’s my absolute favourite recipe – I hope you like it!

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Perfect buttercream

Ingredients

  • 200g butter, room temperature
  • 3 – 3 ½ cups icing sugar, sifted
  • 1 tsp vanilla bean paste
  • 1-2 Tbsp milk, room temperature, to thin

Method

  1. Cube butter and place in a large mixing bowl. Beat with a paddle attachment until smooth, pale and creamy (approx. five minutes)
  2. Add 3 cups icing sugar and 1 Tbsp milk. Mix on low until just combined, then increase to medium and mix for a further 1-2 minutes until well combined.
  3. Add vanilla bean paste and mix for a further 1 minute.
  4. If icing is too thick, add 1 Tbsp milk. If icing is too thin, add additional ½ cup icing sugar.

This post was made possible thanks to Fisher & Paykel. All words and images are, and always will be, my own.



Beginner’s guide to baking: Baking powder vs. baking soda

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Ever wondered what all those different kinds of sugar are all about? Or why the temperature of butter really matters? Then you’ll love this new series covering off all the basics of baking – from why ingredients are important right through to how to set up your kitchen. Have a burning question? Then pop it in the comments below and I’ll try and cover it off in an upcoming post.

First off we’re taking a look at those two little white powders that seem to do the same thing, but you always seem to need the one you don’t have – baking powder and baking soda! While they’re both leaveners (which means they make things rise), they’re actually pretty different. So…

What is baking soda and when do I use it?
Time for my sixth form chemistry to shine! Remember the whole base vs. acid thing from high school? Well that’s pretty much what this comes back to. Baking soda is a base, which means that when you mix it with an acid it’ll react to create something – in baking, that means carbon dioxide which puffs up your baking.

Basically, when you see baking soda in a recipe there will also be some kind of acid in there – maybe lemon juice, buttermilk, yoghurt or brown sugar. You need to have this acid there for the baking soda to react with, otherwise your baking won’t rise and will have a strange metallic taste to it.
The trick is making sure you use just the right amount of baking soda in your baking – that means measuring carefully! Baking soda is pretty strong (about three times more powerful than baking powder) and you need to hit the sweet spot between having enough to react with the amount of acid in your recipe – that way, no metallic after taste.

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How about baking powder?
So baking powder is actually a mixture of a couple of things – baking soda, cream of tartar and often a little cornflour. The clever thing is that cream of tartar is actually an acid (just a dry one!), so the baking soda already has the right amount of acid to react with in every teaspoon.

Because of this, you’ll notice that baking powder is usually used when there isn’t another acid in a recipe. But, because life’s not always simple, there are always exceptions to this rule.

Sometimes you have a recipe that uses an acid that you don’t want to use up through a reaction with baking soda – for example, you might want a tang of lemon or yoghurt in your cake. In that case, you’d use baking powder instead of baking soda so the acid can live on the baking, bringing in all that lovely tangy flavour.  

Why do some recipes need both?
These recipes usually have some acid in them, but not enough for a reaction with baking soda to create the lift that’s needed. If that’s the case, baking powder is used as well to give the recipe that little boost it needs. You need to strike the perfect balance.

If I’m playing around with my own recipe, how much do I need to use?
As you can probably tell, it really does vary. But as a general rule, use around ¼ tsp of baking soda OR 1 tsp of baking powder for every cup of flour in a recipe.

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Pretty interesting, right? Whether you’re just getting into baking or are already a keen cook, knowing why things work the way they do is such a helpful skill to have – I know I love it!

If knowing the ins and outs of baking soda and powder was super interesting to you, then you might be a Curious Novice – you’re keen to improve your skills, enjoy a good recipe book, love giving things a go yourself and are curious about why things work the way they do.

Sound like you? Maybe not? Fisher & Paykel have created eight different cooking styles to help Kiwis get the most out of their time in the kitchen – if you know why you cook the way you do, you’re more likely to get the best results.

Either way, pop over to the Fisher & Paykel website and do their ‘What’s Your Cooking Style’ quiz – you might be surprised!  

Now that you’re a baking soda and powder pro, check out my recipe for blueberry and lemon scones below and see if you can work out why baking powder is used over baking soda. Good luck!

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Blueberry and lemon scones
Makes six. Recipe adapted from Radio New Zealand.

Ingredients

  • 2 cups flour
  • 4 tsp baking powder
  • 4 Tbsp caster sugar
  • 80g butter, cold
  • 1 cup blueberries, fresh or frozen
  • 2 tsp lemon zest
  • ¼ cup natural, unsweetened yoghurt
  • ¾ cup milk

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 200 degrees Celsius. Line a baking tray with baking paper and set aside.
  2. In a large bowl, whisk together flour, baking powder and caster sugar.
  3. Grate butter and add to dry ingredients, tossing to mix. Add blueberries and lemon zest and mix until combined.
  4. Combine yoghurt and milk in a small bowl and whisk to combine. Pour onto other ingredients and mix with a butter knife until just combined.
  5. Scoop batter onto a floured bench and shape into a rectangle around 3cm (two fingers) thick. Brush with a little milk and sprinkle with caster sugar. Cut into six squares.
  6. Transfer to a baking tray and bake for 15-20 minutes or until golden. Cool slightly before serving.

This post was made possible thanks to Fisher & Paykel. All words and images are, and always will be, my own.



Winter wellness smoothie

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There are so many things to love about winter – for me it’s snuggly nights at home, warming winter meals, crisp morning walks, thunderstorms and cuddly cats.

But there’s one thing the season brings that I’m sure we would all rather go without – illness! As soon as the weather gets cooler, colds and flus seem to be everywhere and if you’re anything like me, you begin doing everything possible to avoid coming down with something.

That’s where this super simple, vitamin-packed winter wellness smoothie comes in – it’s the perfect way to support your immunity and help keep those winter sniffles away. The best part? It only takes five minutes.

What makes this recipe great is that you don’t need piles of fresh fruit and veggies to make it – just some banana, tinned pineapple in juice, unsweetened yoghurt and Barker’s Lite Squeezed NZ Blackcurrant syrup.

It’s the Barker’s Lite Squeezed NZ Blackcurrant fruit syrup that makes this smoothie such a vitamin-packed winter booster – blackcurrants are naturally loaded with vitamin C and antioxidants. Plus it’s made with 50% less sugar than regular Barker’s Blackcurrants and has no artificial sweeteners, colours or flavours. Basically it has all the goodness, without any extra nasties (and fewer calories!).

I’m going to be honest: I’m not a morning person or much of a smoothie person. But you know what? I absolutely love this recipe – so much that I’ve sacrificed an extra five minutes in bed a few mornings this week to make sure I can whip one up before work.

Once you have a bottle stashed in your fridge you can try all kinds of other quick ideas – like folding 1 Tbsp of fruit syrup through 300g unsweetened yoghurt to enjoy on its own or on top of your favourite cereal for a totally delicious, vitamin-packed morning treat. And remember – you can always check out Barker’s for more winter wellness recipe ideas.

Enjoy!

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Winter wellness smoothie
Adapted from Vegalicious Recipes

Ingredients

Method

  1. Place all ingredients in a blender and blend for 20-30 second until smooth.
  2. Pour into a glass. Serve with extra pineapple if desired.

giveaway_HTWD

Barker's-Winter-Wellness-Reader-Giveaway-NZ

The team at Barker’s have given me a winter wellness prize pack to giveaway to one lucky reader packed with everything you see above – pretty awesome, right?

To enter, simple check out this post on our Facebook page and follow the instructions. You can earn a bonus entry by leaving a comment on this post too – but you need to enter on Facebook first!

This post was made possible thanks to Barker’s. All images and words are my own.

Cheese-lovers savoury loaf

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The older I get, the more I love cheese. In salads, muffins and pizzas; in sauces, with pasta or simply sliced with crackers – cheese is one of the most versatile ingredients you can have stashed in your fridge. It’s the perfect excuse to always have a variety of cheeses on hand, right?

But with just two of us in our house, there’s no point in buying the big packets of cheese you see in the supermarket – we simply won’t get through it fast enough. And with different recipes calling for different cheeses, how do you commit to just one type for the coming month?

Well, now you don’t have to choose. Dairyworks’ awesome range of cheeses are all about convenience – that means they come in smaller sizes (think 250g blocks), are cleverly packaged and are all totally resealable. So now it’s easy to have everything from Tasty to Mozzarella, Parmesan to Gouda in your fridge all at once – without the waste!

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Three ways with… Banana bread

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Ever have those days when you desperately need to bake something but have no time and barely anything in the cupboards? Yeah, it happens to the best of us.

Whether you’re a keen baker or just like to bake from time to time, I’ve discovered a fab product that you have to have tucked in your cupboards for those forgotten shared lunches, birthdays and visiting guests – Edmonds Banana Cake Mix.

Not only does the finished product taste as good as from-scratch, but you’re bound to have the other ingredients you need tucked in your cupboard already. But the best part? You can make three cakes from a single packet. How awesome is that?

That doesn’t mean you need to make three basic banana cakes – how about three delicious (and super simple) takes on banana bread? Luckily I have you covered with recipes for peanut butter and chocolate, salted caramel and raspberry and coconut banana bread.

The only trouble is you never have those perfectly brown bananas when you need them. Well guess what? It totally doesn’t matter! Simply poke holes with a fork into all sides of whatever bananas you have on hand and warm them in the microwave in 30 second bursts until they’re nice and brown. Simple, right?

What I love most about these recipes is that the finished banana breads taste just like they’re made from scratch, but they take next to no time to whip up. While they’ll be in the oven for the best part of an hour, you’ll have the batter mixed up in five minutes flat. Perfect!

So cover yourself for those baking emergencies – or let’s be honest, anytime you need something sweet – and pick up a packet of Edmonds Banana Cake Mix. You’ll love it!

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Basic banana bread

Ingredients

Method

  1. Preheat oven to 170 degrees Celsius and grease and line a loaf tin.
  2. Place all ingredients in a large bowl and mix until just combined.
  3. Pour into prepared loaf tin and spread evenly. Place in oven and bake for 45 – 55 minutes or until an inserted skewer comes out clean.
  4. Allow to cool in tin for 10 minutes, then turn out onto a wire rack to cool completely.

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Salted caramel variation

Additional ingredients

  • 3 Tbsp salted caramel (try my recipe here) + extra to drizzle

What to do

  1. Pour salted caramel over banana bread batter once you have poured it into the prepared loaf tin. Pull a knife through the mixture to marble the salted caramel through the batter.
  2. Bake as usual and drizzle with extra salted caramel once cool.

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Peanut butter and chocolate variation

Additional ingredients

  • ¾ cup chocolate drops + 1 Tbsp extra
  • 2 Tbsp smooth peanut butter

What to do

  1. Once batter has been mixed, add ¾ cup chocolate drops and mix through until evenly dispersed. Pour into prepared loaf pan.
  2. Place 1 Tbsp peanut butter in a mug and warm in the microwave for 20 seconds. Drizzle over banana bread batter and marble through batter using a knife. Bake as usual.
  3. Once cool, drizzle with melted chocolate and warmed peanut butter.

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Raspberry and coconut variation

Additional ingredients

  • 1 ¼ cups frozen raspberries
  • ¼ cup desiccated coconut
  • 2 Tbsp icing sugar
  • ½ – 1 tsp milk
  • Freeze-dried raspberries and shredded coconut, to finish

What to do

  1. Once batter has been mixed, add frozen raspberries and desiccated coconut. Mix until just combined. Pour into loaf pan and bake as usual.
  2. Combine icing sugar and milk in a mug and mix until well combined and runny. Once loaf is cool, drizzle with icing and finish with freeze-dried raspberries and shredded coconut.

giveaway_HTWD

Thanks to the lovely team at Edmonds I have a prize pack filled with $50 of Edmonds products to giveaway to one lucky reader.

To be in to win, simply leave a comment below and tell me what you would bake with Edmonds Banana Cake Mix.

This post was made possible thanks to Edmonds. All words, images and recipes are my own. Entries close 11.59pm Wednesday 18 May. The winner will be chosen at random and notified on Thursday 19 May. Winner must make contact within 3 business days or they’ll forfeit the prize and a new winner will be drawn. Sorry – this giveaway is only open to New Zealand residents.

Chilli chocolate hi-hat cupcakes

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Chances are you have a pot of mayo perched in your fridge ready for your salads and savoury dishes. But have you ever thought about using it in some sweet baking?

Yip, there’s a secret ingredient inside these delicious chilli chocolate hi-hat cupcakes – they’re packed with mayo!

I know what you’re thinking; why would you use mayo in cupcakes?

Well, ultimately mayo is just eggs and oil – two ingredients that are used in baking all the time. So when you bake with mayo, you’re really just switching out the eggs and oil you’d usually use for this cupboard staple – perfect for when you’re in a pinch! Using mayo also makes the finished cupcakes both light and dense at the same time – it sounds like a strange combination, but it’s absolutely beautiful.

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